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reporter on the latest in the senate on president obama's proposal on the fiscal cliff and the debt ceiling. this is about five minutes. >> andrew taylor covers congress for the associated press. there were some attempts by mitch mcconnell to get roll-call votes on the president's debt plan and his fiscal cliff plan and the debt ceiling plan. what was he trying to do? >> guest: he was trying to embarrass the democrats. for instance, the president's plan on the debt ceiling was basically allowing the president to request whatever increases without the approval of congress and he thought that would embarrass democrats if they had to vote for it particularly endangered ones. >> sounded like leader reid took the bait. how the democrats respond? >> guest: there are a lot in politics going on here. we just talked about politics from mcconnell's side. democrats are aware that even if they allow -- even if they get the republicans to crumble on raising tax rates for upper bracket people there is still going to be a need next year, say march, to increase the debt limit and that was what john boehner
. >> fiscal cliff. >> fiscal cliff. >> that dreaded fiscal cliff. >> stephen: yes, the dreaded fiscal cliff. an unavoidable money will technology the razor-sharp financial rocks below. it all started back in 2011 during the showdown over raising our debt ceiling when republicans wanted spending cuts and obama wanted to raise taxes. which led to a budget crisis that congress solved by not solving it. (laughter) instead, they handed it over to something called "the supercongress" which couldn't fail because it was super. (laughter) unfortunately it was also congress so it failed. (laughter) and as a result -- (applause) as a result -- (applause) as a result, folks, we are facing another thing called sequestration which at first sounds like rationing the amount you can watch "sea quest." (laughter) but it's even worse than that. (laughter) sequestration is automatic spending cuts that both sides agree would trigger a new recession. it's like congress put a gun to the economy's head and swore it will pull the triger if congress doesn't put its own gun down. (laughter) it's kind of like a mexica
, use the tools to sign up people for the can kicks back campaign to avoid the fiscal cliff and cut the national debt. the 81-year-old simpson went "gangnam style" to make his point. ♪ >> i have a bum knee. horse, horse. ride the horse. >> senator, thank you for that. and that's your morning dish of "scrambled politics." and now for a look at your national weather, let's turn to bill karins. he has your weather channel forecast. >> the best part is the underwater robot for a place that doesn't have water. >> maybe it's a pool. >> yes. >> and they need to inspect it. >> counter-terrorism measures in the backyard. you never know. good morning, everyone. getting out the door this morning, it's very cold up in new england. tell you what, the lack of snow is really becoming a slightly alarming especially if you have any interest in snowy weather recreation or skiing or ice skating or maybe you like to go snowmobiling. the northern half of the country is sparse. 7% of the country has snow cover. most of that is the high elevations in the rockies and northern rockies. it's about as low a
the fiscal cliff and fix our debt issues and i'll keep bringing you the lawmakers, economists, and
of coffee this morning. starbucks ceo has sobering advice to offer on the looming fiscal cliff, that the consequences will be far worse than last year's debt ceiling fight when the u.s. credit rating was downgraded for the first time ever. his message to lawmakers, now is not the time to play politics. it's about doing right by the american people. >> i think if people would get in the room and leave their ego behind, and not be so skewed towards the party but be so sensitive to the lens of the american people, we will have an agreement. >> poppy harlow is joining us with more. we've been talking about how this will affect us. schultz says this goes way beyond our boarders. >> it's global. something that stuck with me talking to him about this, the people who need a deal most will be hurt the most. here's why. >> this single issue has a seismic affect on the rest of the world, that we have never been as connected and the domino effect of a bad outcome here will have significant negative consequences, domestically and around the world, not the least of which will be the level --
consequence of this and by this i mean going over the fiscal cliff will be significant , but what i don't %-effort, either self delusion r misrepresentation of the facts. you all, as republicans control the house of representatives. as we saw during the debt ceiling discussions in 2011, it is not a pretty perch from which to take on the bully pulpit of the presidency. >> but i think what we need to do is not get caught ii the trap of the compromise is raising taxes. i think there are many other compromises you could have. for example, i think one compromises we could save some money and military spending even though i think that is the most important -- lou: 55 billion? >> absolutely. i think we could..3 a think we could also say that,3 you know what, the ridge could pay more for their medicare. the rich could receive less for their social security. those are compromises i presented directly to the president a year-and-a-half ago, and he has done zero. his party has done zero. they are hell bent on let's go soak there race. lou: with all respect, have you had this discussion with your p
or the fiscal cliff. well, i might remind people that the fiscal cliff was gone over in august of 2011. . some have already forgotten. we were told if we didn't have a debt ceiling increase by august 2 we were going over the financial cliff, it was financial armageddon. everything would melt down. it was all going to be just this horrible financial malay. it was a disaster. we could not allow ourselves to get to august 2 without having a debt ceiling increase. some of us took -- we made proposals and we took a look at what was being proposed. we said, are you kidding? a supercommittee? that's not going to do any good. they'll never be allowed to reach an agreement. some of us were told, well, of course they'll reach an agreement because if they don't, there will be these massive amounts of devastating cuts to our defense and devastating cuts to medicare. they'd never allow $300 billion or so to be cut from medicare on the other side of the capitol here. and i reminded my friends, they just cut $700 billion from medicare for obamacare. this president and the senate were pitting our seniors agai
to strike a deal before the end of the year on reducing the national debt to avoid that fiscal cliff. republican aid describe the tentative white house proposal this way. $1.6 trillion in revenue presented by secretary treasury secretary timothy geithner and stimulus and $400 billion in medicare and other entitlement savings. a permanent increase in the debt limit. >> so, let's get more on the standoff right now. joining us senator bernie sanders of vermont. he caucuses with the democrats. senator, first of all, congratulations on your re-election. thanks for coming in. republicans say, you know what, they'll be flexible, but the democrats have to be flexible, too, especially when it comes to entitlement spending. medicare, medicaid and even reform. are you open to any of that? >> when republicans talk about being flexible, we have not heard one definitive word to what they mean. second of all, our republican friends look up and understand that this issue of the fiscal cliff was debated during the election and, you know what, mitt romney lost. obama won. the american people are very
joins us ere in just moments to take a look at the fiscal cliff. a man who, as i said earlier in the broadcast was present at the previo precipices and survived it all. he will give us his insights. first, going to wall street, the markets tonight. "moneyline." stuck in a fairly tight trading range. investors cautious as they gow increasingly nervous about the fiscal cliff. the dow jones industrial dow 14 points, sp lost and ahalf, nasdaq down six. over 3 billion shares traded on the big board today. two re companies announcing special cash dividends. e investment ompany the announcing a dividend of $0.20 per share in the special dividend of a dollar per share both paable before year's end. and announcing a dolar dividend per share, payable on christmas eve. in its release, they went on to say that after january 1st the company beieves paying cash didends may not be the most effective way of rewarding sharders withtse higher taxes on dividends. well, our next guest heresays, as washington is wrestling with a fiscal clef they are not contending with far greater allenges, often
with both parties to find common ground. solving the fiscal cliff in a that addresses the true drivers of our debt and saves american jobs will be a great way for the president to start his second term and for the good of our country and my colleagues, we're ready to work with the president to achieve those goals. >> mr. speaker, a couple of things. first, on the issue of tax rates, are you willing to accept no deal that includes some increase in the top tax rates? and i'm also wondering, what our final deadline is on this. >> increasing tax rates draws money away from our economy that needs to be invested in our economy to put the american people back to work. it's the wrong approach. we're willing to put revenues on the table but revenues that come from closing loopholes, getting rid of special interest deduckses and not raising rates we think is better for the economy, pure and simple. secondly, the american people expect us to find common ground, to work together and to resolve this and frankly sooner is better than later. >> you've been doing this for a long time. can you be candi
on the goals of averting the fiscal cliff. is anyone talking about what we are trying to accomplish here? it seems that the ultimate result needs to be reining in the debt of this country. america owes more than $16 trillion to debtors like china and that number is growing by billions a day. we are spending $1 trillion a more than we take in every year. you can do the math on that and see if we didn't curb that trend. a day of reckoning will come. nearly 100% of the fight in washington has been about taxes and if we should be raising rates or getting revenue by limiting deductions for that same group. the president has dug in his heels on this issue. treasury secretary timothy geithner making it clear this weekend there will be no deal if rates do not go higher. i don't understand this insistence. if you want to get $100 from me do you care where i get it from? no. you just want your money and the white house is ready and willing to let america go over the cliff over the way the so-called wealthy pay more. something does not make sense here to me. something else makes less sense, namely
amount of money. >> you can talk with oklahoma senator tom coburn about the fiscal cliff, affordable care act and the future of the republican party on booktv's index. the senator has written several books and reports including his latest, the debt bomb. join our freedom our conversation with calls, e-mails and tweets comical doctor and author and senator tom coburn at noon eastern on booktv's in depth on c-span2. >> now on booktv thomas stanton argues the difference between companies that successfully made it through the 2008 financial crisis and those that didn't was willingness of upper management to listen to feedback before making decisions. this is about an hour and 15 minutes. >> good afternoon and welcome to the cato institute's. i'm the director of financial regulations, mark calabria and i am moderator of today's book form. when reading press coverage of a financial crisis one constantly comes across phrases like the banks did this for the banks did that. lost in these generalities, there was no one responds to the financial crisis or events that preceded it. different firms too
, and protect the middle class from the fiscal cliff. without spending cuts and entitlement reform, it will be impossible to address our country's debt crisis and get our economy going again and to create jobs. right now all eyes are on the white house. the country does not need a victory lap. it needs leadership. it is time for the president, congressional democrats to tell the american people what spending cuts they're willing to make. with that, i will take a few questions. [indiscernbile] it has been very clear over the last year and a half. i have talked to the president about many of them. you can look at our budgets where we outlined specific proposals that we passed last year and the year before. we know what the menu is. we do not know what the white house is willing to do to get serious about solving our debt crisis. [indiscernbile] i am not going to get into details, but it is very clear what kind of spending cuts need to occur, but we have no idea what the white house is willing to do. >> most public statements have been optimistic. we are sensing a different tone in th
it fiscal cliff at the end of the year because we are near a debt crisis. driven by too much spending. everyone was the focus on how can raise taxes. we should be focused on how to get spending under control. we have a spending problem. we should be focused on what really matters. the debt crisis means the economy collapses, we have people out of work. it means we do not have money to pay for basic benefits for medicare and social security. it is important to talk about deductions and tax policies in terms of tax reform. john vader opened the door for that. president obama has in it -- john boehner opened the door for that. president obama has indicated no intention of looking at -- . host: what deductions would you host: what deductions would you put on the table? guest: tax reform is not to raise revenue. is to make the tax code less of a drag on the economy. we do that by lowering tax rates and getting rid of some deductions, exemptions, credits. but we do not do it to raise revenue. host: chuck marra, how important our deductions? guest: they are very important. if you get into th
in secret day after day, week after week. the deadlines are getting closer. the fiscal cliff is getting closer. then on the threat of panic, force through some deal to maintain the status quo for taxes, more spending, more debt. it would be presented to the senate in a way that if it's not adopted immediately, the country will be in great fiscal danger. this process. -- this process needs to be taken out of the shadows. we need public debate, and people would know the facts that are now being hidden from us and hidden from members of congress. we don't know what's going on. the latest article in "politico" today said the deal -- the so-called deal has been negotiated by the speaker of the house and the president, not even harry reid is in the meetings, apparently. certainly not the members of the united states national or the members of the house of representatives -- united states senate or the members of the house of representatives. and if we had a public debate, people would discover that according to the c.b.o. mandatory spending is going to increase -- increase nearly 90% over the
the first paycheck and go, oh, this is what the fiscal cliff meant. yeah. whoo, 2013. >>> all right. the next story involves a new grassroots campaign that is starting. meant to draw attention to the nation's debt crisis. it is our "favorite story of the day." the campaign is called -- "the can kicks back." >> the campaign is aimed at young people and features former republican senator allen simpson, a rather spry allen simpson at that. >> stop instagraming your breakfast and tweeting your problems and getting on youtube so you can see gangnam style. ♪ >> gangnam style! >> ha-ha. >> shake what your mama gave you, allen. >> mercy me. mercy me. loving this. >> 81-year-old allen going gangnam style. best impression of psy. >> america at its finest. the campaign urges young people to use social media to get people to sign a petition calling for a bipartisan solution to the nation's $16 trillion debt. i will give $100 if he just stops. stops. >> keep going. he dances better than me, doesn't he? >> that's impressive, man. >> it is. >> how serious he is about the debt. get up and do gang
. >> you can talk to oklahoma senator tom coburn about the fiscal cliff, the affordable care act and the future of the republican party on booktv's in death. the senator has written several books and reports including his latest, the debt bomb. join our three our conversation, your calls, e-mails, tweets, for senator tom coburn at noon eastern on booktv's in depth on c-span2. >> now a forum on the rule of law in sino, a panel that includes u.s. ambassador to china and jon huntsman. we will show as much as we can until our live event at 8:30 eastern. [applause] >> thank you for that very kind introduction. i have a great honor of being a distinguished fellow here at brookings but i can tell with justice brier and with these distinguished legal experts appear there's nothing distinguished about me at all. today i come pretty much as a regular fellow as opposed to any kind of distinguished fellow. what we have ahead is a great presentation by some people you will find interesting, about development of the rule of law in china. i wanted to offer a few introductory comments on the chi
a budget deal. the fiscal cliff has come about because of happenstance. we have a series of events that were designed to happen. we have other things that are going to happen that are not necessarily intended. debt going to hit the ceiling again very shortly after the first of the year. that is something at happens when it happens. host: one piece you alluded to with entitlements is the simpson-bowles would raise the social security retirement age. explain where it would go. guest: it would raise the retirement age. right now it is scheduled to go up to 67. that was a deal reached in the 1980's to keep social security solvent. we are living longer. or social security was first created, the retirement age was 65. life expectancy was 64. now we're talking life expectancy of around 80. what this does is raising up and indexes s list. in 2075, the benefits will start being paid out. when you're 69, there are 67. like expectancy will grow at a faster rate. some argue this is still a cut because it is changing from current law. others argue it is not a change. host: which he agreed to re
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)